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Monday, 01 March 2021 00:00

The circulatory system in the body is rarely given any thought when it functions properly. It consists of blood flowing efficiently throughout the body, and is able to fight infection by supplying white blood cells with proper nutrients. When blood flow becomes restricted, artery disease may develop and progress. This can be a result of excess plaque that has developed in the arteries, which can narrow the space that blood can flow through. If this condition is left untreated, it may lead to conditions that can include reduced blood flow to the brain which may be followed by a stroke. Common symptoms of poor circulation are felt in the feet and legs, which may become numb and can cause difficulty in walking. It may be beneficial to practice a daily walking routine, and time and mileage may be gradually increased. If you have signs you may have poor circulation, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can determine what the best course of treatment is for you.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Scott Shrem of Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Friday, 26 February 2021 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Monday, 22 February 2021 00:00

Stretching your feet and ankles can help improve or maintain their strength and flexibility. Yoga is a great way to stretch the whole body, including your feet and ankles. The simplest stretch for your toes and ankles is to simply sit upright on the floor with your legs straight out in front of you. You may sit with your back against a wall or with your hands on the floor behind you to provide yourself with more stability. From this position, you can extend and flex your toes, your ankles, or both your toes and your ankles at the same time. To learn more about specific stretches for the feet and ankles, please consult with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Scott Shrem from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Being the backbone of the body, the feet carry your entire weight and can easily become overexerted, causing cramps and pain. As with any body part, stretching your feet can serve many benefits. From increasing flexibility to even providing some pain relief, be sure to give your feet a stretch from time to time. This is especially important for athletes or anyone performing aerobic exercises, but anyone experiencing foot pain or is on their feet constantly should also engage in this practice.

Great ways to stretch your feet:

  • Crossing one leg over the others and carefully pull your toes back. Do 10-20 repetitions and repeat the process for each foot
  • Face a wall with your arms out and hands flat against the wall. Step back with one foot and keep it flat on the floor while moving the other leg forward. Lean towards the wall until you feel a stretch. Hold for 30 seconds and perform 10 repetitions for each foot
  • Be sure not to overextend or push your limbs too hard or you could risk pulling or straining your muscle

Individuals who tend to their feet by regular stretching every day should be able to minimize foot pain and prevent new problems from arising.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Stretch Your Feet
Monday, 15 February 2021 00:00

Many pregnant women notice cracked heels have developed over the course of their pregnancy. This can happen for a variety of reasons, including because of the added weight the heels must endure, hormonal changes, and changes in gait. Patients have found relief when the feet are soaked in warm water, followed by applying a good moisturizer on the entire foot. Having a pedicure performed is an effective method to alleviate cracked heels, which can include using a pumice stone to soften the dry skin. It is important to take proper care of your feet while pregnant, and if you would like additional information on how to achieve this, please consult with a podiatrist who can address any concerns you may have.

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Scott Shrem from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
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