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July 2022

Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

Freiberg’s Disease

Freiberg’s disease, also known as Freiberg’s infarction or Frieberg's infraction, is associated with pain in the forefoot. It has to do with the softening of one of the metatarsal heads and typically occurs in teenagers that are growing. If excessive weight is put on this part of the foot, it can lead to a microfracture of the metatarsal head. Symptoms are swelling and discomfort at the ball of the foot and the joint associated with the affected toe – usually the base of the second toe. It is common for one with this affliction to have a long second toe that sustains repetitive force. A person with Freiberg’s disease might limp during the acute phase of the condition and it can become chronic before it is diagnosed. An X-ray or MRI can be used to help diagnose this disease and it is often treated non-invasively, with proper fitting shoes with a wide toe box and metatarsal pads to offset the pressure on the area. Sometimes a walker boot, cast, and/or anti-inflammatory medication is needed to offset weight bearing. There can be a residual deformity of the joint and discomfort that remains over time. However, rarely is surgery done to clean out the joint or shorten the metatarsal. If you/your child is experiencing pain and swelling near the ball of the foot, it is suggested you consult with a podiatrist who can take proper measures to detect the problem and treat it.

Some foot conditions may require additional professional care. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Scott Shrem of Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Rare Foot Conditions

The majority of foot conditions are common and can be treated by a podiatrist.  Standard diagnostic procedures are generally used to identify specific conditions and treatment can be rendered. A podiatrist also treats rare foot conditions which can be difficult to diagnose and may need extra attention and care. 

There are many rare foot conditions that can affect children. Some of these can include:

  • Freiberg’s disease
  • Kohler’s disease
  • Maffucci syndrome

Freiberg’s disease - This can be seen as a deterioration and flattening of a metatarsal bone that exists in the ball of the foot. It typically affects pre-teen and teenage girls, but can affect anyone at any age. Symptoms that can accompany this can be swelling, stiffness, and the patient may limp. 

Kohler’s disease - This often targets the bone in the arch of the foot and affects younger boys. It can lead to an interruption of the blood supply which ultimately can lead to bone deterioration. The patient may limp or experience tenderness, swelling, and redness.

Maffucci syndrome - This affects the long bones in a child’s foot leading to the development of abnormal bone lesions. They are benign growths and typically develop in early childhood and the bones may be susceptible to breaking. 

A podiatrist can properly diagnose and treat all types of rare foot conditions. If your child is affected by any of these symptoms or conditions, please don’t hesitate to call our office so the correct treatment method can begin.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.
 

Read more about Rare Foot Conditions

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Plantar Warts are a troublesome condition that affect the feet. This affliction consists of skin growths that are caused by the contraction of a strain of human papillomavirus (HPV). Since HPV is spread from person to person and thrives in moist environments, people are particularly susceptible to plantar warts when walking barefoot in highly-trafficked public spaces. Plantar warts come in different shapes and sizes but are generally hard and callus-like. There are a variety of ways in which plantar warts can be treated, depending on the severity of the warts. In more extreme cases, a podiatrist might determine that treating the plantar warts with laser treatment is the best course of action. This treatment method involves applying a concentrated beam of light to essentially sear off the wart from the foot. This method of treatment is 60-75% effective in treating plantar warts. However, this treatment also does not come without its risks. Sometimes, this treatment can cause scarring of some kind on the affected area. If you suffer from plantar warts, a podiatrist can help you decide if laser treatment might be a good option for you.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Scott Shrem from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts

There is a growth plate in the heel of the foot that is known as the calcaneal apophysis. This is the area that connects the Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia to the heel. The foot condition that is known as Sever’s disease occurs as a result of excess tension on the Achilles tendon, or possibly from an injury to the heel. This generally affects children and young teenagers who participate in sporting activities. Common symptoms can include gradual heel pain, and many patients describe it as feeling like a bruise. Pain may be felt in the heel area only. Sever’s disease often develops from participating in high-impact sports such as basketball, football, or baseball. To confirm a diagnosis of Sever’s disease, a physical exam will be performed, and occasionally, an X-ray may be ordered to determine how advanced the growth plate is, in addition to observing if a stress fracture has occurred. Relief begins with temporarily stopping the activity that caused the condition, and performing specific heel stretches, which may ease the pain. If your child is affected by Sever’s disease, it is advised that a podiatrist be contacted who can begin the correct treatment process.

 

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Scott Shrem from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Tuesday, 05 July 2022 00:00

Roll Before You Run

Although running can be an excellent way to burn your calories for the day, if you do not properly prepare your body beforehand, you may be setting yourself up for a foot injury. One way to help prevent an injury, is to roll out your feet using a foam foot roller or tennis ball. Often when runners do not roll out their feet before runs, their foot muscles become tighter and more restrictive, which can increase the stress felt on the ankle. This consequently increases the risk of injuries. By rolling out your feet, you can loosen the tissue and muscles in your feet. Besides preventing injuries, this technique also gives you more flexibility and movement in other parts of your body, including your legs. When rolling your feet, you might consider sitting to control the amount of pressure put on your feet, spending approximately two minutes per foot. While rolling out their feet, runners often look for areas on their feet that carry a particularly large amount of tension or tightness. Don’t take chances when it comes to your feet. You might consider reaching out to a podiatrist who can best help you prevent injuries during your runs.


 

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Scott Shrem of Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Preventing Running Injuries
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