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Tuesday, 09 August 2022 00:00

On the outer side of the foot in front of the heel, lies the cuboid bone. This cube-shaped structure helps connect the foot to the ankle, provides the feet with stability, and helps dissipate the mechanical force it bears while walking and standing. The cuboid bone can become dislocated, which is known as cuboid syndrome, or cuboid subluxation. This can occur as a secondary injury of a sprained ankle, excessive strain on the area, or if the foot rolls inward repetitively. Flat feet and osteoporosis can also contribute to an occurrence of cuboid syndrome. Cuboid syndrome can cause pain, tenderness, redness and swelling on the outside of the foot, and it may be difficult to move the ankle. Maintaining a healthy body weight, stretching before any physical activity is undertaken, and wearing properly fitted shoes can all reduce the risk of cuboid syndrome occurring. Check with a podiatrist for additional preventative methods, or to have the condition properly diagnosed and treated.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Scott Shrem  from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about All About Cuboid Syndrome
Tuesday, 02 August 2022 00:00

Cracked heels, also known as heel fissures, is a common and unsightly condition that negatively impacts the wellness of your feet. Simply put, this condition occurs when the skin surrounding the heel and bottom of the feet becomes exceedingly dry. This skin can crack, causing fissures. In many cases, this condition is harmless. However, cracked heels can be unattractive and, in severe cases, might lead to infection and swelling. If you are diabetic, you stand at an increased risk of suffering from cracked heels. This is because diabetes can make your feet dry and deprive the skin of necessary nutrients, making cracked heels more likely. Additionally, in some cases, diabetes can damage the nerves present in one’s feet, which can prevent sweat glands in the feet from releasing sweat. The deprivation of sweat can reduce the moisture in the feet, increasing the probability of the onset of cracked heels. Therefore, while cracked heels are not necessarily a sign of diabetes, diabetics can face an increased risk of suffering from this affliction. If you are a diabetic and want to protect yourself from cracked heels, consider contacting a podiatrist.


 

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Scott Shrem from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

Freiberg’s disease, also known as Freiberg’s infarction or Frieberg's infraction, is associated with pain in the forefoot. It has to do with the softening of one of the metatarsal heads and typically occurs in teenagers that are growing. If excessive weight is put on this part of the foot, it can lead to a microfracture of the metatarsal head. Symptoms are swelling and discomfort at the ball of the foot and the joint associated with the affected toe – usually the base of the second toe. It is common for one with this affliction to have a long second toe that sustains repetitive force. A person with Freiberg’s disease might limp during the acute phase of the condition and it can become chronic before it is diagnosed. An X-ray or MRI can be used to help diagnose this disease and it is often treated non-invasively, with proper fitting shoes with a wide toe box and metatarsal pads to offset the pressure on the area. Sometimes a walker boot, cast, and/or anti-inflammatory medication is needed to offset weight bearing. There can be a residual deformity of the joint and discomfort that remains over time. However, rarely is surgery done to clean out the joint or shorten the metatarsal. If you/your child is experiencing pain and swelling near the ball of the foot, it is suggested you consult with a podiatrist who can take proper measures to detect the problem and treat it.

Some foot conditions may require additional professional care. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Scott Shrem of Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Rare Foot Conditions

The majority of foot conditions are common and can be treated by a podiatrist.  Standard diagnostic procedures are generally used to identify specific conditions and treatment can be rendered. A podiatrist also treats rare foot conditions which can be difficult to diagnose and may need extra attention and care. 

There are many rare foot conditions that can affect children. Some of these can include:

  • Freiberg’s disease
  • Kohler’s disease
  • Maffucci syndrome

Freiberg’s disease - This can be seen as a deterioration and flattening of a metatarsal bone that exists in the ball of the foot. It typically affects pre-teen and teenage girls, but can affect anyone at any age. Symptoms that can accompany this can be swelling, stiffness, and the patient may limp. 

Kohler’s disease - This often targets the bone in the arch of the foot and affects younger boys. It can lead to an interruption of the blood supply which ultimately can lead to bone deterioration. The patient may limp or experience tenderness, swelling, and redness.

Maffucci syndrome - This affects the long bones in a child’s foot leading to the development of abnormal bone lesions. They are benign growths and typically develop in early childhood and the bones may be susceptible to breaking. 

A podiatrist can properly diagnose and treat all types of rare foot conditions. If your child is affected by any of these symptoms or conditions, please don’t hesitate to call our office so the correct treatment method can begin.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.
 

Read more about Rare Foot Conditions
Thursday, 21 July 2022 00:00

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

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